Generational Dynamics World View News

Discussion of Web Log and Analysis topics from the Generational Dynamics web site.
John
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:22 am

** 11-Feb-2019 Genocidal climax of generational crisis war

zzazz wrote:> If as many GD posts suggest, the next big war is the genocidal
> kind, then analyses of the aftermath should account for the fact
> that in a genocidal war the targeting will be different.
> Specifically, instead of having the bulk of the nukes incoming to
> North America targeting missile silos located in the desolate
> areas near the Dakota bad lands they will instead target cities,
> nuclear reactors, spent nuclear fuel storage depots, and major
> dams. It is true that the most dangerous radiotelephones quickly
> decay out of spent nuclear fuel, but the resulting radiation is
> still at least twice as bad as it would have been.

> Waring parties will immediately lose the ability to manufacture
> new nukes as well as any other modern weapon, so there will be
> weapon hoarding, which in turn means that the destruction will be
> drawn out, perhaps over decades as hoarded weapons are gradually
> used to wipe out the enemy's attempts to reorganize a
> civilization.


Every generational crisis war ends with genocide -- with what I call
an "explosive climax," which is usually some genocidal act so horrific
that it traumatizes everyone and it convinces the traumatized people
on both sides that it's not worth fighting any longer.

During generational Awakening and Unraveling eras, tensions grow. In
the case of a civil war between two ethnic or religious groups,
society alternates between low-level violence and ceasefires until the
next bout of violence. Once the nation enters a generational Crisis
era, then both sides become impatient and start crossing red lines
("Regeneracy events") until the genocide gets so
bad that one side or the other surrenders and the fighting
stops.

A recent example of these concepts in the Sri Lanka civil
war which I was able to follow fairly close in its final years.
What was interesting was that when the climax occurred in 2009,
every analyst in the world seemd to make the same mistake you did,
and assumed that fighting would continue. I wrote that it
was the same as the end of WW II and that fighting would stop.
It turned out that Generational Dynamics was right, and
every other analyst in the world was wrong.

** Sri Lanka government declares all out war against Tamil Tiger rebels
** http://www.generationaldynamics.com/pg/xct.gd.e080104.htm#e080104



** Tamil Tigers surrender, ending the Sri Lanka crisis civil war
** http://www.generationaldynamics.com/pg/xct.gd.e090517.htm#e090517



** Tamil Tigers renounce violence, to join Sri Lanka political process
** http://www.generationaldynamics.com/pg/xct.gd.e090525b.htm#e090525b



I'm wary of making the assumption that it will be impossible to
manufacture new nukes. Particularly in a vast country like China,
there are bound to be secret manufacturing facilities built into
mountains somewhere, and once all the spy satellites have been knocked
out of the sky, it will be impossible to find them.

John
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:24 am

** 11-Feb-2019 New Crisis era begins 58 years after previous climax

CH86 wrote:> JohnX, I am going to state another clear position here: If China
> or Russia is the enemy in the 4T Crisis War; that means that 9/11
> could NOT have been the catalyst of the the 4T crisis era. That
> means that America was still in a generational Unraveling Mood
> until around 2011 with the start of Arab Spring and direct
> tensions with Russia and China, if the crisis war enemy is going
> to be China (or Russia). During the last crisis war (WW2) the
> international crisis started in 1931 with the Japanese invasion of
> Manchuria, after that until 1945 the enemy was always
> Germany/Japan/Fascism, communism did emerge as an enemy after 1945
> but that was after the Crisis war and after Fascism was
> defeated. For this reason 9/11 could not have started the Crisis
> because the crisis enemy leading to the crisis war is usually the
> same until the war climax of the crisis war.


The Unraveling era does not end because of some "catalyst." It's
purely biological, and occurs when the traumatized survivors of
the previous crisis war disappear (retire or die). My research
indicates that this occurs 58 years after the genocidal, explosive
climax of the previous crisis war.

So in America this means that the Unraveling era ended in 2003, and
the Crisis era began. 9/11 had nothing to do with it. In the 1990s,
the Silents were in charge and were able to keep the Boomers'
stupidity under control. In the 2000s, the Silents are gone, and the
Boomers were unable to keep the Gen-Xers' stupidity under control,
leading to the financial crisis, and to the increasing mess that the
world is in, and has been worsening every year since then. Today,
the Gen-Xers are running pretty much everything, which is
why the world is on the verge of disaster.

John
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:48 am

** 11-Feb-2019 FDR and World War II

I received an e-mail message this morning from someone who said that
he had a conversation with his grandfather over the weekend. His
grandfather lived through the 1930s and fought in World War II. He
says that "Roosevelt was the real reason that World War 2 started."

What's interesting about this is that people who call Trump
the most divisive president in American history don't realize
that FDR was even more divisive.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=5168&p=43973#p43973

Guest in Seoul

Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby Guest in Seoul » Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:00 pm

FishbellykanakaDude wrote:
Guest wrote:
( Are the Japanese considered the "Jews" of Asia? )


Absolutely not. The Chinese are the 'Jews' of Asia. Here in lies the problem with arm chair types like you: you don't know what you are talking about. Ethnic Chinese live in and often dominate the economies of Asian countries, to the point of being despised. I don't know how many would actually support the Red Chinese government. That's an open question.


John is spot on in his analysis of Asia.

--A guest from Seoul


I was referring to the possibility of the Japanese being perceived of as the "Jews of Asia", especially by the Chinese, due to the fact that the Japanese are (as a nationality/country) smarter, more industrious, more successful, and more of a "World Icon" than other asian populations.

It seems to me that the Chinese are more like the Colonialist English than the Jews of Western Eurasia.

The Chinese dominate very overtly, and by not only economic and political power, but also by increasing their populations in "host" countries.


The Japanese are completely different than the Chinese. The Chinese can integrate much more than the Japanese (who prefer to remain much more separate anyway). The Chinese will always be outsiders, but to a lesser extent than the Japanese, who are viewed as foreigners by others Asians as opposed to the Chinese. It's a bit complicated to explain. The Japanese are hated for their refusal to acknowledge (or even feel guilty about) the crimes of 1895-1945. The Chinese are hated because they are a ruthlessly efficient and highly cunning group of people. If I had to choose a motto for the ethnic Chinese, it would be 'We will survive."

CH86
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby CH86 » Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:11 pm

John wrote:** 11-Feb-2019 FDR and World War II

I received an e-mail message this morning from someone who said that
he had a conversation with his grandfather over the weekend. His
grandfather lived through the 1930s and fought in World War II. He
says that "Roosevelt was the real reason that World War 2 started."

What's interesting about this is that people who call Trump
the most divisive president in American history don't realize
that FDR was even more divisive.

viewtopic.php?f=4&t=5168&p=43973#p43973


JohnX, Has it ever occured to you that the WW2 vet's story and opinion is not merely political divisiveness left over from before the war but instead his grandfathers genuine recollection of how events actually unfolded. Instead of listening like other boomers to the globalist narrative of how we got into the war, instead of listening to that uncritically boomers; could it be that his veteran grandfather actually remembers and knows how we REALLY got involved in the war. It has been proven by various sources that FDR implemented an 8 point plan regarding outright provoking a Japanese attack in order to trigger an Axis declaration of war, so much so that generals and admirals were rejecting offers of assignments to pearl harbor because they knew that whoever was in command there was planned to be sacrificial lamb after the Japanese finally attacked, than after the attack FDR simply implemented the policy that he already wanted and had already started to enact anyway. Globalists have always wanted the truncating of the Human condition and the domestication of humans.

Navigator
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby Navigator » Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:28 pm

John wrote:
So I've now been unemployed for two years, and I'm coming to the point
where I'm going to run out of money this year, probably in the
July-October time frame, and that will be the end of both me and
Generational Dynamics. I'm very grateful to those of you who have
provided one-time donations. They mean a lot to me, but I need a
regular salary. In the two months or so since I started writing this,
I have never received so much as a tiny nibble of hope from anyone who
might be willing to pay a salary. So I've come to the conclusion that
I am truly alone and hopeless in an effort to get a salary.



John,

I was greatly saddened and worried by your words here. Please do not give up hope. While I cannot offer you a job outright immediately, there is about a 20% chance that I might be able to get you work by the summer. Outside of that, I do have some contacts with people who might be able to help you. Feel free to contact me directly. I will do what I can to assist your networking efforts in the short term.

I think that your work is exceptional and of great worth.

I went through similar difficulty myself, being involved in a business failure at the time of the dot com bust in 2000. I lost everything and then some. I was able to get back on my feet through a job I considered beneath me, and then some miraculous things happened to allow me to not only regain what I had lost, but even do much much better.

I am sure others who read your work may be able to help out with networking and helping you find employment.

John
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Mon Feb 11, 2019 11:59 pm

Navigator wrote:> John, I was greatly saddened and worried by your words here.
> Please do not give up hope. While I cannot offer you a job
> outright immediately, there is about a 20% chance that I might be
> able to get you work by the summer. Outside of that, I do have
> some contacts with people who might be able to help you. Feel
> free to contact me directly. I will do what I can to assist your
> networking efforts in the short term.

> I think that your work is exceptional and of great worth.

> I went through similar difficulty myself, being involved in a
> business failure at the time of the dot com bust in 2000. I lost
> everything and then some. I was able to get back on my feet
> through a job I considered beneath me, and then some miraculous
> things happened to allow me to not only regain what I had lost,
> but even do much much better.

> I am sure others who read your work may be able to help out with
> networking and helping you find employment.


Actually, there are no others. Even though it's still only a 20%
possibility, you're the only person in the last two months who has
even tentatively expressed the possibility of helping out -- by which
I mean earning a salary as a software engineer, writer, journalist,
analyst, or anything related.

Thank you very much for offering to help. Please write to me
privately at john@GenerationalDynamics.com or call 617-864-0010 if I
can provide any information.

John
Posts: 8513
Joined: Sat Sep 20, 2008 12:10 pm
Location: Cambridge, MA USA
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Tue Feb 12, 2019 12:35 am

** 11-Feb-2019 Russia and Turkey disagree on the fate of Syria's Idlib

Military officials from Russia visited Ankara Turkey on Monday to
resolve some pressing issues in the Syria war, especially the problem
of Idlib.

Ever since President Trump announced the withdrawal of 2,000 American
troops from Syria, all the news coverage about Syria has been related
to that decision:

  • Whether there will be a resurgence of ISIS. The Kurdish YPG,
    backed by the US military, is just about to cleanse the last
    stronghold in eastern Syria of ISIS fighters, and that announcement is
    expected in a day or two. Many ISIS fighters have returned to their
    home countries, but there are still one or two thousand of them left
    floating around in Syria and Iraq, and numerous officials have
    expressed a fear of an ISIS resurgence.
  • Whether the Turkish army will be set loose to exterminate the
    Kurds in northern Syria, since Turkey considers them all to be
    terrorists, belonging to the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK). The
    Kurds are US allies and did the actual fighting to drive ISIS out of
    al-Raqqa, it's former capital city (caliphate). However, many people
    are complaining that the US is abandoning the Kurds now that we've
    used then (up), and leaving them to their fate with the Turks.
  • Whether the Turks can at least build a 30-km long buffer
    zone in Syria along the border with Turkey, in order to
    protect Turkey from the Kurds. The US favors the buffer
    zone, but Russia and Syria oppose it.
  • Who will control the large region of eastern Syria from which
    the Kurdish YPG has ejected ISIS? The Kurds want to keep it,
    while the Syrians want to take control of it.

As serious as all those issues are, there's probably nothing as
serious as the fate of Idlib province in northwestern Syria. Despite
multiple peace conferences discussing Idlib, Syria's Bashar al-Assad
is waiting for the go-ahead from Russia to "take back control" of
Idlib.

When al-Assad was conducting genocide and ethnic cleansing in other
regions of Syria, including Aleppo, Ghouta and Daara, hundreds of
thousands of people were permitted to flee to Idlib. The "cleansed"
regions left behind are now being populated by Iranians and Hezbollah
Lebanese.

There are now over three million Syrians living in Idlib. Of those
three million people, about 60,000 or so are anti-Assad rebels in
Idlib, including both "moderate" rebels and jihadists in al-Qaeda
linked Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS), formerly the al-Nusra Front.

You know, it's quite a world we live in today. If a nation wants to
commit genocide and ethnic cleansing, it just calls all the people
"terrorists." So the Chinese have declared millions of Uighurs are
terrorists, the Burmese have declared millions of Rohingyas are
terrorists, and Bashar al-Assad has declared millions of Arab Sunnis
are terrorists. Just think, nobody would have complained about the
Holocaust if Hitler had just said all the Jews are "terrorists."

Anyway, al-Assad has declared that all the Arab Sunnis are
"terrorists," and the Turks say that all the Kurds are "terrorists."

Al-Assad would like to "take control" of Idlib by exterminating all
the "terrorists," which means millions of men, women and children.
This would cause an enormous humanitarian disaster. The Turks are
scared to death of al-Assad's plan, because Turkey is already hosting
3.5 million Syrian refugees, and al-Assad's plan would send millions
more into Turkey. From there, many of them would pour into Europe, so
there would be a new refugee crisis in Europe.

So the statement issued by Russia and Turkey after Monday's
meeting said:

> [There is a] need in particular to take decisive measures to
> ensure security in the Idlib demilitarized zone.

> “Despite provocations, we underlined the importance and need to
> continue partnerships between our two countries’ intelligence and
> military forces to establish peace and to support stability in
> Idlib."


There was no word on what "decisive measures" are planned.

There are three options on the table, according to news reports:

> First of them is forcing the militants to leave, possibly by
> applying coercive measures including a military offensive, a
> solution favored by Bashar Assad regime and its allies, Russia and
> Iran. However, this "solution" make Ankara's blood run cold due to
> concerns of triggering a new migrant wave bound to Turkey's
> borders. ...

> Turkey would prefer to resort a limited operation to break the
> resistance of HTS or continue negotiations to persuade militants
> dissolve the organization.


This diplomatic stalemate has been going on for several months now.
Al-Assad wants to militarily cleanse Idlib "terrorists" (Arab Sunnis),
and Iran and Russia support him. Turkey wants either a limited
operation, or to do nothing. Al-Assad is bloodthirsty and ready to
go, and it seems unlikely to give in to Turkey forever.


--- Sources:

Withdrawal of US forces in Syria likely to start in 'weeks,' CENTCOM
commander says
https://taskandpurpose.com/us-troop-wit ... a-timeline
(Reuters)

High-level Turkish-Russian diplomatic talks increase to resolve
situation in Idlib
https://www.dailysabah.com/diplomacy/20 ... n-in-idlib
(Daily Sabah, Ankara)

Russia, Turkey agree to 'take decisive measures' in Syria's Idlib
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/02/ ... 18773.html
(Al-Jazeera)

Russia, Turkey agree on decisive action in Syria's Idlib: RIA
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mide ... SKCN1Q01L3
(Reuters)

--- Related:

** 1-Dec-18 World View -- Evidence grows of Assad's 'final solution', extermination of Arab Sunnis in Syria
** http://www.generationaldynamics.com/pg/xct.gd.e181201.htm#e181201




** 28-Oct-18 World View -- Syria peace summit issues delusional call for political solution in Idlib
** http://www.generationaldynamics.com/pg/xct.gd.e181028.htm#e181028

John
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Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby John » Tue Feb 12, 2019 1:17 pm

** 12-Feb-2019 Answers to Iran questions from India's Open Magazine

An editor at Open Magazine in India has asked me questions about
Iran for an article on the 40th anniversary of Iran's revolution.
The following are the questions and the answers:

> 1. Looking back, how has the Islamic Revolution altered the
> history of the Middle East and the rest of the world?


There were three events that occurred in 1979 that set the direction
of the Mideast. The Islamic Revolution changed Iran from a Western
ally to a Western enemy, and radicalized the Mideast. The Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan, which was an invasion of a Muslim nation by a
Christian nation, further radicalized the Mideast and Pakistan. And
the Salafist attack on Saudi Arabia's Grand Mosque was the first major
terrorist attack in recent times, and it led to Osama bin Laden and
his band of jihadists to leave Saudi Arabia and go to Afghanistan to
fight the Russians. These events can be traced directly to the
Iran-Iraq war and to the 9/11 terror attack.

> 2. What are your thoughts on Khomeini's legacy?



Ruhollah Khomeini's greatest sin is that he corrupted Islam by
twisting into a policy called Wilayat al-Faqih (Guardianship of the
Jurist) which turned himself into an "infallible" Supreme Leader who
could order the arrests, torture, rape, beatings, and executions of
political opponents with impunity. Furthermore, he devised a
constitution with absolutely no checks and balances, which makes Iran
into a kleptocracy, unable to get anything done except with bribery
and extortion. Khomeini was truly evil. He has fouled Islam and
destroyed Iran.

> 3. Many famous intelligence officials and news correspondents who
> have worked in Iran have opined that they had underestimated the
> inherent strengths of that country to survive insurmountable
> odds. Your comments.


Dictators always survive in a police state, where political opponents
can be arrested, tortured, raped, beaten, and executed at will with
impunity. Look at Josef Stalin, Mao Zedong, Pol Pot, Bashar al-Assad,
Xi Jinping, Robert Mugabe. They were all in power for years or
decades. What you call "inherent strength" is the ability to use
violence to control the opposition.

A lot of people talk about "regime change" in Iran, without having any
idea what that means. If all it means is replacing one Supreme Leader
by another, it will make no difference at all. The problem is that
the constitution and entire government are a kleptocracy, where it's
impossible to survive without bribery, corruption and violence.

However, generational theory tells us that an important change is
coming. The fanatical hardliners in Iran are in the generations that
lived through and fought in the 1979 Revolution, and those people are
quickly disappearing. The younger generations, who grew up after the
1979 Revolution, have no such fanaticism. In fact, they're generally
pro-American, pro-Western, and have no particular interest in seeing
Israel pushed into the sea. These younger generations are
increasingly in power, and they will dramatically change Iran's
politics. Some opposition figures are even suggesting that the son of
the deceased Shah could come back and restore a secular government.

> 4. Do you think that Iran has been villainised over the past 40
> years because it took on the might of the US and threw out an
> American stooge out of power? How justified are the West's
> sanctions on that country?


Iran is a country that abducted American ambassadors, and declares
"death to America" and "death to Israel" every single day. They're
corrupt, violent terrorists, and they're spreading terror throughout
the Mideast in Syria, Lebanon, Gaza, Iraq and Yemen. Of course
they're going to be villanized, and they deserve it.

> 5. Did the 1979 Revolution intensify the Shia-Sunni conflict and
> how?


By changing from a secular government to a radical Shia government,
they radicalized the Wahhabi Sunni extremists and other jihadists.

> 6. What are the untold stories of the Islamic Revolution? Why did
> Saddam spare Khomeini while he was in exile in Iraq? How come he
> became a darling of the international media overnight in France?
> Were there more to these developments than meets the eye?


These are all political developments that were not nearly as important
as the three major events in 1979 that I listed above.

> 7. Iran is still a power that continues to surprise the West. Do
> you think there are chances that it will become a nuclear power
> soon?


Well, I was surprised myself when I did research for my book and
discovered that no analysts, journalists or politicians have even the
vaguest clue what's going on Iran, as judged by the fact that they say
one incredibly stupid thing after another every day. That's why they
keep getting surprised -- because of their universal stupidity.

Will it be a nuclear power soon? They're undoubtedly continuing some
nuclear development, and/or buying nuclear technology from North
Korea. Even under the Iran nuclear treaty, they're permitted to
develop nuclear weapons by 2025, and they're certainly planning to do
so.

> 8. How important is it to understand Iran in order to understand
> political Islam?


I don't even know what this means, since no one wants to bother to
understand political Islam or Islam at any level. However, someone
who wants to understand Iran and Islam can start by reading my book,
which has the best and most accessible exposition of both that I've
seen.

> 9. Who are your favourite historians who have written extensively
> on Iran?


The best was Homa Katouzian. In my book, I showed how generational
changes led to the historical flow Russia/Britain-Iran border wars ->
Tobacco Revolt -> Constitutional Revolution -> White Revolution
protests -> Islamic Revolution. Most historians discussed these as
individual, almost unrelated events. Katouzian was the only one who
understood how one leads to the next.


> I have one more question to John:

> Isn't it Saudi Arabia, a friend of the US, which is the
> fountainhead of Islamic terrorism in the Middle East (we feel the
> pressure in India as well because Islamism in India is funded by
> the Saudis)? Why do you insist it is Iran? Besides, Israel isn't a
> saint after all and has earned the wrath of UNHCR on many
> occasions for its treatment of Palestinian civilians. It is a
> country whose economic mainstay is arms and its government has
> been accused of terrorism by religious groups within. Your
> comments.


You've packed a lot into that paragraph.

  • "Saudi Arabia is the fountainhead of Islamic terrorism in the Middle
    East": SA is "A fountainhead," not "THE fountainhead." In Yemen, SA
    is in a never-ending proxy war with Iran, in Syria SA is supporting
    many anti-Assad rebels, and the Jamal Khashoggi incident has shocked
    everyone, and has had the ironic effect of pushing SA closer to
    Pakistan. Many people also blame SA for 9/11. SA itself has an
    internal split between the Sauds and the Wahhabis. At any rate, Saudi
    Arabia and Iran are headed for war.
  • "SA is a friend of the US": Many in Congress do not consider SA to
    be a friend. Obama hated SA, and SA hated Obama. SA and US have had
    a close relationship since the 1930s based on the following core
    agreement: SA will provide oil to the world, and the US will provide
    security to the Mideast. Trump's "friendship" with SA is based on
    that core agreement. This core agreement greatly benefits everyone,
    including India. There have been many problems in the SA-US
    relationship over the decades, but this core agreement has remained
    the most important factor.
  • "Islamism in India is funded by the Saudis": If I'm not mistaken,
    most of the funding for Islamism in India comes not from the Saudis
    but from Pakistan's ISI. However, that may be a distinction without a
    difference because Pakistan is a close ally of SA and China, both of
    whom are enemies of India. India, on the other hand, is a close ally
    of Iran, as illustrated by the Chabahar seaport project. Hindus and
    Shia Muslims have been allies for centuries, all the way back to the
    seminal Battle of Karbala in 680. I discussed this in my book.
  • "Israel isn't a saint": Nobody's a saint, especially in the Mideast.
    Israel is a democracy and has an independent judiciary, which makes
    then unique in the Mideast. Muslim Arabs are much safer living in
    Israel, and have more freedoms, than in any other Mideast country.
    Just as Hindus in India feel a close emotional link with Shia Muslims
    in Iran, and tend to excuse Iran's sins, Jews and evangelical
    Christians in America feel a close emotional link to Jews in Israel,
    and tend to excuse Israel's sins.
  • "Israel's government has been accused of terrorism by religious
    groups within": And also by Jews and Israel supporters in the US.
    There's also anti-Jewish sentiment in the US -- read the current news
    stories about Ilhan Abdullahi Omar, who is the Somali Muslim
    congressional representative from Minneapolis, which has a large
    Somali community.
  • "earned the wrath of UNHCR": Many in the US consider UNHCR to be
    highly biased, condemning actions in Israel while ignoring massively
    greater human rights violations by others.
  • "John's LinkedIn profile has no mention of this Iran book. Why
    so?": I have two careers -- as software engineer and as
    journalist/analyst/author. I use the LinkedIn profile for software
    engineering, and potential employers would be confused by a mention of
    an Iran book. However, I'm thinking of changing my LinkedIn
    profile.

CH86
Posts: 354
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2018 8:51 am

Re: Generational Dynamics World View News

Postby CH86 » Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:38 pm

LOL to that whole "Analysis" of Iran history and effects on geopolitics from the late 1970s. This is no more than the standard Globalist/Neocon party line on Iran. The revolution is looked at by John as a sudden outbreak of pure evil from Iran. Not one mention of the fact that globalists were robbing Iran blind for two decade up to the revolution. Iran merely severed ties with those countries which those globalists were based from. The notion that Iranians are just clamoring for western style liberal democracy is refuted by the simple fact that the regime has lasted so long under firm footing. If the mass of Iranians wanted western democracy the regime would have crumbled into dust long ago no matter how many toughs the regime employed and how many bullets were fired into the crowds. Toughs and bullets did not save the shah back in 1979, the fact that the protests die down rather than gain momentum when they occur indicates that they represent the discontent of a minority of Iranians. That the Mullahs retain a firm hold on power indicates their support by the majority of the populace in Iran.

The Nuclear program if pursued would be more likely to be resolved by war rather than agreement and/or one side turning away from the issue.
Last edited by CH86 on Wed Feb 13, 2019 10:54 am, edited 1 time in total.


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