Search found 6 matches: Ogallala

Searched query: ogallala

by aeden
Tue Dec 10, 2019 12:21 pm
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

https://specials-images.forbesimg.com/i ... ?fit=scale

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/rabob ... ue-volcker

Once again H the carry trade and reality fail to see the actual usual suspects blamed on sticky wages and why
the narrative workers as paper tigers blame labor.

The trigger was the secret printing of billions of dollars in order to support the Vietnam war. The French caught on and so did the rest of the world. If Richard Nixon hadn't pulled the plug on gold being removed from America at 8200 tonnes then the United States would have lost their status as world reserve currency. Now, we see a failing system being propped up by asset inflation and trillions of dollars printed. That's lowering American's purchasing power. What does it mean? It means that as long as the government can keep lowering your standard of living by debauching the currency, the government corruption will survive.

The demsheviks are a percentage of another issue from the Andropov plan still ignored and yes we understand the Arc of instability.
The notion of unintended consequences is still ignored since the endogeneity linchpin of reflection.

As for some around who remember the vivid smells of burned cities you only have hope since its the other side of the Lords patience.
http://gdxforum.com/forum/search.php?ke ... sf=msgonly

http://gdxforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php ... rns#p20447 no, did not forget these hard facts

http://gdxforum.com/forum/search.php?ke ... sf=msgonly
by Higgenbotham
Sat Aug 17, 2013 2:29 pm
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

aeden wrote:3. Decades ago, the Ogallala Aquifer had an average depth of approximately 240 feet, but today the average depth is just 80 feet. In some areas of Texas, the water is gone completely.

water wheat weather
In some areas of Kansas the water is gone completely too and so are the towns in those areas.

My grandparents farmed in Nebraska and we made annual trips there in the 1960's and 1970's. During those annual trips, we drove around the countryside and every year it was pointed out who got irrigation installed. Over 10 years it went from mostly non-irrigated to mostly irrigated. They say irrigation isn't needed to grow corn in eastern Nebraska which is true but yields are a lot better. The aquifer tends to run dry where the water is needed the most.

Just one more data point of the coming dark age. Though I believe many more will hit first.
LAWRENCE, Kan. -- Water levels in the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast underground reservoir, have dropped significantly in sections of Kansas since last year, according to the Kansas Geological Survey.

Rex Buchanan, interim director of the Kansas Geological Survey, recently completed an annual tour of the 1,400 wells that tap into the Ogallala in western Kansas. He said overall levels dropped about 3.5 feet in January 2013 compared to last year. Declines in January 2012 averaged 4.25 feet, he said.
Buchanan said even in a normal year, the aquifer only recharges at an annual rate of about a half-inch. But users in some sections are pumping water out at a rate of two to four feet per year -- sometimes more. That rate only increases during periods of prolonged drought, such as the one the region has been experiencing for the past year.

"There's no question about it, we're running smack dab into the limitations of the aquifer itself today and the demand placed upon it by those pumping wells," said Mark Rude, executive director of Groundwater Management District No. 3, which governs water resources in much of southwestern Kansas, said
http://journalstar.com/news/state-and-r ... be87b.html
by aeden
Sat Aug 17, 2013 4:17 am
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

Most Americans have never even heard of the Ogallala Aquifer, but it is one of our most important natural resources. It is one of the largest sources of fresh water on the entire planet, and farmers use water from the Ogallala Aquifer to irrigate more than 15 million acres of crops each year. It covers more than 100,000 square miles and it sits underneath the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming and South Dakota.
Unfortunately, today it is being drained dry at a staggering rate. The following are a few statistics about this from one of my previous articles...
1. The Ogallala Aquifer is being drained at a rate of approximately 800 gallons per minute.
2. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, "a volume equivalent to two-thirds of the water in Lake Erie" has been permanently drained from the Ogallala Aquifer since 1940.
3. Decades ago, the Ogallala Aquifer had an average depth of approximately 240 feet, but today the average depth is just 80 feet. In some areas of Texas, the water is gone completely.
So exactly what do we plan to do once the water is gone?
We won't be able to grow as many crops and we will not be able to support such large cities in the Southwest.
If we have a few more summers of severe drought that are anything like last summer, we are going to be staring a major emergency in the face very rapidly.
If you live in the western half of the country, you might want to start making plans for the future, because our politicians sure are not.

http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/arch ... -drying-up

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2 ... trust.html

http://theclimatescepticsparty.blogspot ... -take.html
water wheat weather
by gerald
Wed Jul 04, 2012 11:13 pm
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

Higgenbotham wrote:
gerald wrote:However, farmland can be more complex then it appears, and it is not for everyone.
I'll add the things that come to my mind. Both of my Grandfathers were farmers in the midwest.

The value of farmland is dependent on access to petrochemical inputs (fertilizer, diesel) that may not be accessible or accessible at prices that make the farming operation profitable.

The value of farmland is dependent on population. SInce populations have been expanding for a long time people don't normally consider what effect decreasing populations would have on farmland prices.

The value of farmland is dependent on the maintenance of international trade and shipping.

As mentioned, the value of irrigated farmland is dependent on maintaining irrigation equipment and aquifers that in come cases are depleting - the Ogallala aquifer in Kansas, for example.

The property tax has to be paid or the land will be lost after a few years. If the owner cannot receive enough income to cover the taxes, the land becomes a liability.
Those are the reasons why one invests in quality land that is well located with no debt. Lesser quality land has and is being removed from production, major sophisticated operators have been able to reduce
costs and there by reduce the risks you mention. Everything has risks, some risks one can deal with, others one can't, "you pay your money and take your chances" We all view and respond to risks differently.
by Higgenbotham
Wed Jul 04, 2012 10:42 pm
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

gerald wrote:However, farmland can be more complex then it appears, and it is not for everyone.
I'll add the things that come to my mind. Both of my Grandfathers were farmers in the midwest.

The value of farmland is dependent on access to petrochemical inputs (fertilizer, diesel) that may not be accessible or accessible at prices that make the farming operation profitable.

The value of farmland is dependent on population. SInce populations have been expanding for a long time people don't normally consider what effect decreasing populations would have on farmland prices.

The value of farmland is dependent on the maintenance of international trade and shipping.

As mentioned, the value of irrigated farmland is dependent on maintaining irrigation equipment and aquifers that in come cases are depleting - the Ogallala aquifer in Kansas, for example.

The property tax has to be paid or the land will be lost after a few years. If the owner cannot receive enough income to cover the taxes, the land becomes a liability.
by Higgenbotham
Sun Jan 01, 2012 8:02 pm
Forum: Finance and Investments
Topic: Financial topics
Replies: 21918
Views: 2950972

Re: Financial topics

John wrote:
Higgenbotham wrote: There really is nowhere to go. It was just a thought that popped into my head as I recognized the inadequacy of all of these candidates.
How about an innocuous farm in the middle of Kansas?
Or Siberia?

Oh wait .. the Chinese are taking over in Siberia
In Kansas, the Ogallala aquifer is going dry.